Nigeria Must Go: Ghanaians Want Nigerians To Quit Trading In Ghana By Nov. 15

Nigeria Must Go: Ghanaians Want Nigerians To Quit Trading In Ghana By Nov. 15


… We’re going nowhere, our companies are licensed – Nigerians
For some years now, the situation of Nigerian traders living in
Ghana could be likened to a mnemonic for the title of one of
the late Chinua Achebe’s novels; No longer at ease. On Monday,
October 28, 2013; many Nigerian traders were summond to an
emergency meeting in the ancient Ghanaian city of Kumasi.
In the same vein, dozens of Nigerian traders, who are members
of the Nigerian Union of Traders in Ghana (NUTAG), the
umbrella body for Nigerian traders in the former Gold Coast;
also had cause to gather at a hotel in the Dansoman
neighbourhood of the Ghanaian capital, Accra on Thursday,
October 24, 2013.
At either conference, their meeting dragged for about three
hours as NUTAG members pondered their situation. Apart from
NUTAG National President, Deacon John Igwe Ukala; and,
National Vice President, Hon. Joseph Obi; others at the October
24 summit; included Tamale Chapter Chairman, Sir Hycinth
Nwoko; Eastern Region Chairman, Sir Linus Okoroigwe; NUTAG
PRO, Chief Ikechukwu Obiora; and, Tema Chapter Chairman, Sir
Kingsley Eboh.
The importance of their sitting could be gleaned from the fact
that, apart from those who happened to be out of town on that
day, every other NUTAG executive member was in attendance.
Furthermore, many of these merchants were sighted at
Nigerian High Commission Accra on Wednesday, October 23.
Reliable sources revealed these Nigerians came to brief their
country’s diplomatic mission of their predicament as well as to
find out what what being done at the governments’ level to
resolve an issue that has lingered for some six years. In many
instances, Nigerian traders did not just have to be absent at
their malls, some had to travel over hundreds of kilometres
from regional capitals to venues, where meeting had been
called.
In other words, aside from losing money from not opening their
shops for business, money was also lost to commuting, not to
talk of stress from long distance shuttles. No pun intended, but
it has come to the point, where some of these merchants seem
more preoccupied with holding meetings than attending to
customers.
“My brother, life has not been easy here for some years. We
have become victims of serial harassment and with this matter
dragging for about six years, some of us are beginning to
wonder, if ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African
States) has any meaning. But, we have to keep trying”, was the
lament of a Nigerian merchant resident in Ghana.
But, the man was not through. Hear his cynical rue:
“Interestingly, this latest attempt to intimidate us is coming a
few days to the opening of ECOWAS 7th Trade Fair. Some
people say we should not trade, but do you know the theme of
this year’s ECOWAS expo in Ghana? It is “Regional integration
through trade ”… My brother, I no fit laugh ; he concluded in
pidgin English.
According to the NUTAG National VP, a section of indigenous
retailers had earlier concluded plans for a demonstration
against Nigerian traders in Kumasi on Friday, October 25.
Although the rally was called off, possibly due to bureaucratic
intervention; the anti-Nigerian traders’ issue again surged to
the fore, barely 48 hours later, when; during a television
presentation, spokeswoman of a section of the indigenous
traders’ body declared that Nigerian traders in Kumasi should
close shop by November 15.
By some coincidence, Travels was in Kumasi for a tour of select
tourist sites, and chose to seize the opportunity to engage some
affected Nigerians. Chief Elieza Obodoekwe, Vice President of
NUTAG in Asante Region, is one of the three NUTAG executives
Travels spoke with in Ghana. Igbo Ukwu, Anambra State-born
Chief Obodoekwe is fondly addressed by his traditional title,
Onwa .
Although Onwa admitted he missed the television presentation,
he said the threat must have been aired because countless
members called him to ask what NUTAG leadership planned to
do. Hear him: “According to a TV3 presentation about 9pm on
Sunday, October 26, 2013; Madam Joanah of Joanah Motors
demanded that Nigerians should close shop. She even issued a
November 15 ultimatum”.
But, what could the woman’s reason be? “Her argument is that
Nigerians are making profit that should ordinarily go to
indigenes. According to her, foreigners are barred from
engaging in retail trade. However, whereas foreigners are not
allowed to do retail-trading inside a market, the law permits us
to operate from our shops in other areas of town”, Onwa
explained.
Onwa went on to recall: “Early this year, around January, many
Nigerian-owned shops across Accra were locked up. The
Ghanaian Government subsequently gave certain conditions
before traders could have their shops reopened. These
conditions included compulsory registration of each company and that the company should also have a certificate to commence business.
“Also, each company must be registered with the office in
charge of VAT; register with IRS (Internal Revenue Service)
and have TIN (Tax Identification Number); apart from
registration with SSNIT. Additionally, certain conpanies are also
required to register with Ghana Investment and Promotions
Council (GIPC).
“In my own case, my company, Best Quality Parts Ltd; has
fulfilled every requirement. Then, there is the issue of every
foreigner living in Ghana now required to have a Residency
Permit, and Non-Citizen ID. I have all of these and my business
is legitimate. So, it is therefore surprising that non-
government officials could be harassing us.
“I don’t think these antagonists have taken the trouble to go to
relevant authorities to find out, if our operations are legitimate
or not. But, I’m very sad because of the anxiety these anti-
Nigerian elements generate through their frequent agitations”.
In this Nigerian’s thinking, head or tail, Ghanaians also stand to
lose: “There are well over 40 Nigerian-owned shops in Asante
Region. If only three Ghanaians are employed at each shop, we
are talking of about 120 Ghanaians that would be out of
business, should we leave town. Yes, if we have to shut down our
business, that means we have no business being here. In other
words, our antagonists want us to leave town”, Onwa reckoned.
The major grouse is that some Nigerians are involved in retail
trade, however there are many other Nigerians that are not
into retailing business but are similarly affected by the
perceived hostile disposition of these rival traders, we gathered.
Travels was told that dealers in Toyota and Datsun spare-parts
are the arrowheads of the rally against Nigerians.
Truck/Trailer dealers around Kumasi’s New Road Junction
appear not to have any problem with Nigerians, we further
learnt. Some Nigerians resident in Ghana remided that
countless Ghanaians were living in Nigeria unharassed. “One of
the biggest restaurants in Warri, Delta State is owned by a
Ghanaian. Also, a major haulage business merchant based in
Nnewi, Anambra State; is of Ghanaian origin”, Onwa cited.
Concluding, Onwa, who was President of Nigerian Youth
Association (NYA) in Ghana from 2004 to 2007; rued: “The sad
reality is that the people now up in arms against us were once
our store-boys. I’ve been here (Suame Magazine, Kumasi) for
almost 24 years. We helped them to get to where they are
today by introducing them to this business. Ironically, the same
people we supported in the past have now turned against us”.
Chief Joseph Okpala, who is Treasurer, Asante Region Chapter
of NUTAG; said Nigerian traders were disturbed that their
country’s authority and the Ghanaian government were still
unable to resolve the matter. “We are really worried”, the man
remarked.
During a chat with Travels in Accra, Hon. Obi; confirmed that
the recent flurry of meetings was prompted by the
predicament of Nigerian entrepreneurs in Ghana, especially
those in Ashanti Region. “Ghanaian spare-parts dealers around
an area called Magazine in Suame, Kumasi; say they want every
shop owned by a Nigerian shut because foreigners are not
eligible to engage in retail trade. That is the main issue”.
As to what NUTAG had been doing to resolve the issue, Obi
recalled; “Some of us (NUTAG national executives) travelled
from Ghana to Abuja about two months ago. We spent four days
(August 21 to 24) in Abuja because of this matter. Among the
things we did, while in Abuja, was a visit to the office of the
minister of trade.
“We also expressed, to various relevant authorities, our
gratitude to the Nigerian Government for sending powerful
delegations to Ghana for talks with their Ghanaian counterparts
regarding our plight. During our stay in Abuja, we were assured
that the matter was being handled by ECOWAS. So, we had
returned to Ghana believing the matter was being treated by
constituted authorities”.
In the face of assurances they got barely two months ago, Obi
and others are expectedly shocked that their alleged
harassment at the hands of rival traders could surge forth
again, so soon. He said NUTAG executives, after a brainstorm
that lasted some three hours resolved to carry on with their
businesses, even as efforts would be made to brief relevant
authorities on both Ghanaian and Nigerian sides of developments as they unfolded.
As to their position after series of deliberations, the NUTAG
executives almost in a chorus; declared: “Nigerians will not close
shop because we are here officially. Our companies are
registered corporate bodies, and we pay our taxes and dues to
the government as at when due”.
But, if they are not welcome by the host community, must they
remain in Kumasi at all cost? “O, don’t get us wrong. It is not
the host community that have asked us to stop doing business
here. Our antagonists constitute a negligible fraction of the
host community. We understand their problem: it is fear of fair
competition. But, not every member of the indigenous spare-
parts dealers’ association are against Nigerian traders. Those
that want us out of business are rival local dealers in Japanese
automobile spare-parts”, Hon. Obi offered.
The influx of Nigerian entrepreneurs into Ghana is generating
mixed reactions among members of the host nation. On one hand are Ghanaian traders, who see the involvement of some
Nigerians doing business in their country as a threat: such
Ghanaians feel that Nigerians are robbing locals of means of
livelihood by playing importer, distributor and retailer all rolled
into one.
On the other hand are Ghanaian consumers, who welcome
Nigerians because of the competitive pricing their presence
commands. We gathered that these category of Ghanaians
prefer to buy from Nigerians, whose traders rely more on huge
turnover than on a hefty profit margin.
In any case, the issue seems to be morphing into an intractible
imbroglio. Six years have rolled by since the crisis broke, yet
the sticking points remain: Should citizens of ECOWAS Member
States be subjected to the same somewhat stringent formalities
for floating a business in Ghana required of people from other
parts of the world?
Hon. Obi, NUTAG National VP, thinks citizens of ECOWAS
member states deserve some exemptions. “I believe ECOWAS
would cease to be relevant, if we continue like this”, he remarked.

Flashback

Shops owned by numerous Nigerians had earlier been shut by
Ghanaian authorities from April 2009 to early 2010. Although all
seems calm and quiet from time to time, there is a current of
mistrust beneath the surface. In deed, a report titled, Tension
brews at Suame Magazine; on page 17 of the August 26, 2011
edition of Daily Guide , pointedly brought the issue to the fore.

“Tension is brewing at Suame Magazine, a business hub of
Kumasi, following a threat by an association of retailers to stop
foreigners from engaging in retail and petty trading in the
area”; read the overture of the Daily Guide story. According to
the report, members of Suame Magazine Retailers Association
(SMRA), an affiliate of Ghana Union of Traders Associations
(GUTA), “have been angered by the growing number of
foreigners, mainly Nigerians, engaged in petty-trading and
retail and have consequently threatened to stop them from
doing business in the area, if government fails to act in that
direction”.

During a chat with Morgan Owusu, Kumasi correspondent of
Daily Guide , SMRA Chairman, Kwame Brenyah, reportedly
wondered: “Why government had failed to enforce the country’s
laws on trading”. Citing relevant statutes as regards foreigners
wishing to engage in trading in Ghana, Mr. Brenyah, who is also
GUTA Representative for Ashanti Region; is reported to have
lamented; “foreigners, particularly Nigerians, had taken over
Magazine … and were selling all manner of goods on tables in the area, a trading activity reserved for Ghanaians”.

According to the report, Brenyah accused “some of the
foreigners of employing indecent business tactics to push
Ghanaians out of petty-trading and retail business”. He
observed that some of the foreigners posing as wholesalers turn
around to retail their products at cheaper costs, after selling
the same goods to Ghanaians engaged in the retail business”.

Brenyah had gone on to laud Ghana Investment Promotion
Council, which set up a task force that “went round arresting
foreigners engaged in petty trading and retail activities”.
Interestingly, Brenyah, in the same breath; alleged that “the
(GIPC) task force split up, when some ambassadors in the
country, whose natives were affected by the exercise, raised
concerns over the matter”.

Brenyah had subsequently threatened that members may resort
to self-help or to take the law in their hand since his
association “believes government is unwilling to protect the
business interests of local people”. Mr. Brenyah had gone on to
declare: “We are giving government a few weeks to act or we
will act ourselves”, the Daily Guide report had forewarned.

Parting on a lighter note

It is worth pointing out that, most of those affected have been
resident in Ghana’s Ashanti Region for over 20 years. This
explains why many of them speak the indigenous tongue, Twi,
fluently. Chief Obodoekwe is an indigene of Igbo Ukwu, Aguata
LGA in Anambra; but, he speaks eloquent Twi.

When asked how good his comprehension of this Ghanaian tongue was, he enthusiastically interjected: “O, I love the language.

But, I must admit that my Twi is not better than that of this
man (Chief Okpala), who speaks the language like an indigene”.

Chief Okpala, of Nwabuike Industries Ltd, is a Japanese motor
spareparts trader and has lived in Kumasi for 21 years. When
asked, how his Twi could be better than Onwa’s; the latter
offered: “You know, some people are better at grasping
languages than other people”.
From MAURICE ARCHIBONG, who was in Kumasi, Ghana
(+233508234202), mauricearchibongtravels@gmail.com
www.mauricearchibongtravels.blogspot.com
************
Send your articles for publicationto editor@paradigmshiftng.com. You can also sendyour eye witness reports, photos and videos toiwitness@paradigmshiftng.com

Click here to subscribe to The Paradigm Newsletter

Comments

comments

One Comment

  1. May be it is a pay back time, remember we also said Ghana Must Go sometime ago.

Share your thoughts


… We’re going nowhere, our companies are licensed – Nigerians
For some years now, the situation of Nigerian traders living in
Ghana could be likened to a mnemonic for the title of one of
the late Chinua Achebe’s novels; No longer at ease. On Monday,
October 28, 2013; many Nigerian traders were summond to an
emergency meeting in the ancient Ghanaian city of Kumasi.
In the same vein, dozens of Nigerian traders, who are members
of the Nigerian Union of Traders in Ghana (NUTAG), the
umbrella body for Nigerian traders in the former Gold Coast;
also had cause to gather at a hotel in the Dansoman
neighbourhood of the Ghanaian capital, Accra on Thursday,
October 24, 2013.
At either conference, their meeting dragged for about three
hours as NUTAG members pondered their situation. Apart from
NUTAG National President, Deacon John Igwe Ukala; and,
National Vice President, Hon. Joseph Obi; others at the October
24 summit; included Tamale Chapter Chairman, Sir Hycinth
Nwoko; Eastern Region Chairman, Sir Linus Okoroigwe; NUTAG
PRO, Chief Ikechukwu Obiora; and, Tema Chapter Chairman, Sir
Kingsley Eboh.
The importance of their sitting could be gleaned from the fact
that, apart from those who happened to be out of town on that
day, every other NUTAG executive member was in attendance.
Furthermore, many of these merchants were sighted at
Nigerian High Commission Accra on Wednesday, October 23.
Reliable sources revealed these Nigerians came to brief their
country’s diplomatic mission of their predicament as well as to
find out what what being done at the governments’ level to
resolve an issue that has lingered for some six years. In many
instances, Nigerian traders did not just have to be absent at
their malls, some had to travel over hundreds of kilometres
from regional capitals to venues, where meeting had been
called.
In other words, aside from losing money from not opening their
shops for business, money was also lost to commuting, not to
talk of stress from long distance shuttles. No pun intended, but
it has come to the point, where some of these merchants seem
more preoccupied with holding meetings than attending to
customers.
“My brother, life has not been easy here for some years. We
have become victims of serial harassment and with this matter
dragging for about six years, some of us are beginning to
wonder, if ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African
States) has any meaning. But, we have to keep trying”, was the
lament of a Nigerian merchant resident in Ghana.
But, the man was not through. Hear his cynical rue:
“Interestingly, this latest attempt to intimidate us is coming a
few days to the opening of ECOWAS 7th Trade Fair. Some
people say we should not trade, but do you know the theme of
this year’s ECOWAS expo in Ghana? It is “Regional integration
through trade ”… My brother, I no fit laugh ; he concluded in
pidgin English.
According to the NUTAG National VP, a section of indigenous
retailers had earlier concluded plans for a demonstration
against Nigerian traders in Kumasi on Friday, October 25.
Although the rally was called off, possibly due to bureaucratic
intervention; the anti-Nigerian traders’ issue again surged to
the fore, barely 48 hours later, when; during a television
presentation, spokeswoman of a section of the indigenous
traders’ body declared that Nigerian traders in Kumasi should
close shop by November 15.
By some coincidence, Travels was in Kumasi for a tour of select
tourist sites, and chose to seize the opportunity to engage some
affected Nigerians. Chief Elieza Obodoekwe, Vice President of
NUTAG in Asante Region, is one of the three NUTAG executives
Travels spoke with in Ghana. Igbo Ukwu, Anambra State-born
Chief Obodoekwe is fondly addressed by his traditional title,
Onwa .
Although Onwa admitted he missed the television presentation,
he said the threat must have been aired because countless
members called him to ask what NUTAG leadership planned to
do. Hear him: “According to a TV3 presentation about 9pm on
Sunday, October 26, 2013; Madam Joanah of Joanah Motors
demanded that Nigerians should close shop. She even issued a
November 15 ultimatum”.
But, what could the woman’s reason be? “Her argument is that
Nigerians are making profit that should ordinarily go to
indigenes. According to her, foreigners are barred from
engaging in retail trade. However, whereas foreigners are not
allowed to do retail-trading inside a market, the law permits us
to operate from our shops in other areas of town”, Onwa
explained.
Onwa went on to recall: “Early this year, around January, many
Nigerian-owned shops across Accra were locked up. The
Ghanaian Government subsequently gave certain conditions
before traders could have their shops reopened. These
conditions included compulsory registration of each company and that the company should also have a certificate to commence business.
“Also, each company must be registered with the office in
charge of VAT; register with IRS (Internal Revenue Service)
and have TIN (Tax Identification Number); apart from
registration with SSNIT. Additionally, certain conpanies are also
required to register with Ghana Investment and Promotions
Council (GIPC).
“In my own case, my company, Best Quality Parts Ltd; has
fulfilled every requirement. Then, there is the issue of every
foreigner living in Ghana now required to have a Residency
Permit, and Non-Citizen ID. I have all of these and my business
is legitimate. So, it is therefore surprising that non-
government officials could be harassing us.
“I don’t think these antagonists have taken the trouble to go to
relevant authorities to find out, if our operations are legitimate
or not. But, I’m very sad because of the anxiety these anti-
Nigerian elements generate through their frequent agitations”.
In this Nigerian’s thinking, head or tail, Ghanaians also stand to
lose: “There are well over 40 Nigerian-owned shops in Asante
Region. If only three Ghanaians are employed at each shop, we
are talking of about 120 Ghanaians that would be out of
business, should we leave town. Yes, if we have to shut down our
business, that means we have no business being here. In other
words, our antagonists want us to leave town”, Onwa reckoned.
The major grouse is that some Nigerians are involved in retail
trade, however there are many other Nigerians that are not
into retailing business but are similarly affected by the
perceived hostile disposition of these rival traders, we gathered.
Travels was told that dealers in Toyota and Datsun spare-parts
are the arrowheads of the rally against Nigerians.
Truck/Trailer dealers around Kumasi’s New Road Junction
appear not to have any problem with Nigerians, we further
learnt. Some Nigerians resident in Ghana remided that
countless Ghanaians were living in Nigeria unharassed. “One of
the biggest restaurants in Warri, Delta State is owned by a
Ghanaian. Also, a major haulage business merchant based in
Nnewi, Anambra State; is of Ghanaian origin”, Onwa cited.
Concluding, Onwa, who was President of Nigerian Youth
Association (NYA) in Ghana from 2004 to 2007; rued: “The sad
reality is that the people now up in arms against us were once
our store-boys. I’ve been here (Suame Magazine, Kumasi) for
almost 24 years. We helped them to get to where they are
today by introducing them to this business. Ironically, the same
people we supported in the past have now turned against us”.
Chief Joseph Okpala, who is Treasurer, Asante Region Chapter
of NUTAG; said Nigerian traders were disturbed that their
country’s authority and the Ghanaian government were still
unable to resolve the matter. “We are really worried”, the man
remarked.
During a chat with Travels in Accra, Hon. Obi; confirmed that
the recent flurry of meetings was prompted by the
predicament of Nigerian entrepreneurs in Ghana, especially
those in Ashanti Region. “Ghanaian spare-parts dealers around
an area called Magazine in Suame, Kumasi; say they want every
shop owned by a Nigerian shut because foreigners are not
eligible to engage in retail trade. That is the main issue”.
As to what NUTAG had been doing to resolve the issue, Obi
recalled; “Some of us (NUTAG national executives) travelled
from Ghana to Abuja about two months ago. We spent four days
(August 21 to 24) in Abuja because of this matter. Among the
things we did, while in Abuja, was a visit to the office of the
minister of trade.
“We also expressed, to various relevant authorities, our
gratitude to the Nigerian Government for sending powerful
delegations to Ghana for talks with their Ghanaian counterparts
regarding our plight. During our stay in Abuja, we were assured
that the matter was being handled by ECOWAS. So, we had
returned to Ghana believing the matter was being treated by
constituted authorities”.
In the face of assurances they got barely two months ago, Obi
and others are expectedly shocked that their alleged
harassment at the hands of rival traders could surge forth
again, so soon. He said NUTAG executives, after a brainstorm
that lasted some three hours resolved to carry on with their
businesses, even as efforts would be made to brief relevant
authorities on both Ghanaian and Nigerian sides of developments as they unfolded.
As to their position after series of deliberations, the NUTAG
executives almost in a chorus; declared: “Nigerians will not close
shop because we are here officially. Our companies are
registered corporate bodies, and we pay our taxes and dues to
the government as at when due”.
But, if they are not welcome by the host community, must they
remain in Kumasi at all cost? “O, don’t get us wrong. It is not
the host community that have asked us to stop doing business
here. Our antagonists constitute a negligible fraction of the
host community. We understand their problem: it is fear of fair
competition. But, not every member of the indigenous spare-
parts dealers’ association are against Nigerian traders. Those
that want us out of business are rival local dealers in Japanese
automobile spare-parts”, Hon. Obi offered.
The influx of Nigerian entrepreneurs into Ghana is generating
mixed reactions among members of the host nation. On one hand are Ghanaian traders, who see the involvement of some
Nigerians doing business in their country as a threat: such
Ghanaians feel that Nigerians are robbing locals of means of
livelihood by playing importer, distributor and retailer all rolled
into one.
On the other hand are Ghanaian consumers, who welcome
Nigerians because of the competitive pricing their presence
commands. We gathered that these category of Ghanaians
prefer to buy from Nigerians, whose traders rely more on huge
turnover than on a hefty profit margin.
In any case, the issue seems to be morphing into an intractible
imbroglio. Six years have rolled by since the crisis broke, yet
the sticking points remain: Should citizens of ECOWAS Member
States be subjected to the same somewhat stringent formalities
for floating a business in Ghana required of people from other
parts of the world?
Hon. Obi, NUTAG National VP, thinks citizens of ECOWAS
member states deserve some exemptions. “I believe ECOWAS
would cease to be relevant, if we continue like this”, he remarked.

Flashback

Shops owned by numerous Nigerians had earlier been shut by
Ghanaian authorities from April 2009 to early 2010. Although all
seems calm and quiet from time to time, there is a current of
mistrust beneath the surface. In deed, a report titled, Tension
brews at Suame Magazine; on page 17 of the August 26, 2011
edition of Daily Guide , pointedly brought the issue to the fore.

“Tension is brewing at Suame Magazine, a business hub of
Kumasi, following a threat by an association of retailers to stop
foreigners from engaging in retail and petty trading in the
area”; read the overture of the Daily Guide story. According to
the report, members of Suame Magazine Retailers Association
(SMRA), an affiliate of Ghana Union of Traders Associations
(GUTA), “have been angered by the growing number of
foreigners, mainly Nigerians, engaged in petty-trading and
retail and have consequently threatened to stop them from
doing business in the area, if government fails to act in that
direction”.

During a chat with Morgan Owusu, Kumasi correspondent of
Daily Guide , SMRA Chairman, Kwame Brenyah, reportedly
wondered: “Why government had failed to enforce the country’s
laws on trading”. Citing relevant statutes as regards foreigners
wishing to engage in trading in Ghana, Mr. Brenyah, who is also
GUTA Representative for Ashanti Region; is reported to have
lamented; “foreigners, particularly Nigerians, had taken over
Magazine … and were selling all manner of goods on tables in the area, a trading activity reserved for Ghanaians”.

According to the report, Brenyah accused “some of the
foreigners of employing indecent business tactics to push
Ghanaians out of petty-trading and retail business”. He
observed that some of the foreigners posing as wholesalers turn
around to retail their products at cheaper costs, after selling
the same goods to Ghanaians engaged in the retail business”.

Brenyah had gone on to laud Ghana Investment Promotion
Council, which set up a task force that “went round arresting
foreigners engaged in petty trading and retail activities”.
Interestingly, Brenyah, in the same breath; alleged that “the
(GIPC) task force split up, when some ambassadors in the
country, whose natives were affected by the exercise, raised
concerns over the matter”.

Brenyah had subsequently threatened that members may resort
to self-help or to take the law in their hand since his
association “believes government is unwilling to protect the
business interests of local people”. Mr. Brenyah had gone on to
declare: “We are giving government a few weeks to act or we
will act ourselves”, the Daily Guide report had forewarned.

Parting on a lighter note

It is worth pointing out that, most of those affected have been
resident in Ghana’s Ashanti Region for over 20 years. This
explains why many of them speak the indigenous tongue, Twi,
fluently. Chief Obodoekwe is an indigene of Igbo Ukwu, Aguata
LGA in Anambra; but, he speaks eloquent Twi.

When asked how good his comprehension of this Ghanaian tongue was, he enthusiastically interjected: “O, I love the language.

But, I must admit that my Twi is not better than that of this
man (Chief Okpala), who speaks the language like an indigene”.

Chief Okpala, of Nwabuike Industries Ltd, is a Japanese motor
spareparts trader and has lived in Kumasi for 21 years. When
asked, how his Twi could be better than Onwa’s; the latter
offered: “You know, some people are better at grasping
languages than other people”.
From MAURICE ARCHIBONG, who was in Kumasi, Ghana
(+233508234202), mauricearchibongtravels@gmail.com
www.mauricearchibongtravels.blogspot.com
************
Send your articles for publicationto editor@paradigmshiftng.com. You can also sendyour eye witness reports, photos and videos toiwitness@paradigmshiftng.com

Click here to subscribe to The Paradigm Newsletter

Comments

comments

One Comment

  1. May be it is a pay back time, remember we also said Ghana Must Go sometime ago.

Share your thoughts

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