Die! Die!! Die!!! By fire!!! Die now!!!


‘‘Die! Die!! Die!!! By fire!!! Die now!!!’’ This was the first unusual news story that made its way to my desk early Thursday morning. Source was Toke our fashion and style producer, narrating her early morning ordeal to me.

She had been startled from her sleep at about 4am that morning by scream from her landlord‘s apartment above her’s. Hurriedly tying a wrapper round herself, she made her way to the upper flat and followed the sound into the guest room. Right there before her were the duo of
husband and wife bent with hands firmly pressed over a shuddering life form.
Momentarily confused, she took a closer look to discover it was none other than “mama nanny”, the live-in middle -aged woman employed to carry-out the house chores. Mama Nanny was convulsing and obviously [to everyone except the couple] in need of urgent medical attention.

After a few minute of convincing the two “literate” oga and madam that it was not demonic manifestation that needed binding and casting, mama nanny was rushed to a nearby hospital.
It was a somewhat funny story that certainly would not have made the 10am, 5minutes News Headlines on our station. But it got me thinking about how gullible and fanatic we (and that means us black folks) still can be under all the designer paraphernalia.

In primary school, we read about the infamous Mary Slessor and her role in putting an end to what I call the murder of innocent babies in the southern part of Nigeria just because they were born twin and interpreted to represent evil, not to mention other equally hideous but unrecorded events in other parts of the country.

Sound really archaic in the face of today’s scientific and medical advancements right? Well so does female genital mutilation/ circumcision FGM, ostensibly to prevent promiscuity among women folk. Though rare but still practiced in some part of the north of the country.
I hear of the unfounded theory of pregnant women advised to avoid eating egg plants to prevent their unborn babies from having boils.When you see a pregnant woman with safety pin
attached to her dress on a sunny afternoon, don’t think she is trying to mend a
tear, she is simply wading away evil spirits. I still cannot understand the ideology behind putting a tread on a baby’s head to stop hiccups when the most reasonable thing would be to give the baby water.

Among the popular superstitions is the theory of the sickle cell and the “Abiku”, where a child is believed to be born into a family several times after every death.Everyman reserves the right to his own religious belief system as long as it does not infringe on the rights of others.
There however arises the need to create a balance. While some of these beliefs are pretty
harmless and are based on the need to instill discipline, healthy habits or on coincidence, some have remained out rightly dangerous and unacceptable.

A visit to a few hospices in the country bears witness to the daily abandonment of children due to all sorts of deformities resulting from avoidable health hazards, earring them the title of
“abnormal” or even “evil” children. It is advised that before holding strongly to
such beliefs, it should stand the test of science. Yes I know you are educated, but so are the
couple living above Toke’s flat.

Oh! By the way I later got a call from a distraught Toke, that mama nanny finally passed on.
She had suffered from hypertension, diabetes and arthritis. I cannot help wondering if this story would have ended differently if she had been taken to the hospital earlier.

Written by Deola Adeniyi who is Media Practitioner in Lagos Nigeria.

Click here to subscribe to The Paradigm Newsletter

Comments

comments

One Comment

  1. Anonymous says:

    i think the couple should be arrested and tried

Share your thoughts


‘‘Die! Die!! Die!!! By fire!!! Die now!!!’’ This was the first unusual news story that made its way to my desk early Thursday morning. Source was Toke our fashion and style producer, narrating her early morning ordeal to me.

She had been startled from her sleep at about 4am that morning by scream from her landlord‘s apartment above her’s. Hurriedly tying a wrapper round herself, she made her way to the upper flat and followed the sound into the guest room. Right there before her were the duo of
husband and wife bent with hands firmly pressed over a shuddering life form.
Momentarily confused, she took a closer look to discover it was none other than “mama nanny”, the live-in middle -aged woman employed to carry-out the house chores. Mama Nanny was convulsing and obviously [to everyone except the couple] in need of urgent medical attention.

After a few minute of convincing the two “literate” oga and madam that it was not demonic manifestation that needed binding and casting, mama nanny was rushed to a nearby hospital.
It was a somewhat funny story that certainly would not have made the 10am, 5minutes News Headlines on our station. But it got me thinking about how gullible and fanatic we (and that means us black folks) still can be under all the designer paraphernalia.

In primary school, we read about the infamous Mary Slessor and her role in putting an end to what I call the murder of innocent babies in the southern part of Nigeria just because they were born twin and interpreted to represent evil, not to mention other equally hideous but unrecorded events in other parts of the country.

Sound really archaic in the face of today’s scientific and medical advancements right? Well so does female genital mutilation/ circumcision FGM, ostensibly to prevent promiscuity among women folk. Though rare but still practiced in some part of the north of the country.
I hear of the unfounded theory of pregnant women advised to avoid eating egg plants to prevent their unborn babies from having boils.When you see a pregnant woman with safety pin
attached to her dress on a sunny afternoon, don’t think she is trying to mend a
tear, she is simply wading away evil spirits. I still cannot understand the ideology behind putting a tread on a baby’s head to stop hiccups when the most reasonable thing would be to give the baby water.

Among the popular superstitions is the theory of the sickle cell and the “Abiku”, where a child is believed to be born into a family several times after every death.Everyman reserves the right to his own religious belief system as long as it does not infringe on the rights of others.
There however arises the need to create a balance. While some of these beliefs are pretty
harmless and are based on the need to instill discipline, healthy habits or on coincidence, some have remained out rightly dangerous and unacceptable.

A visit to a few hospices in the country bears witness to the daily abandonment of children due to all sorts of deformities resulting from avoidable health hazards, earring them the title of
“abnormal” or even “evil” children. It is advised that before holding strongly to
such beliefs, it should stand the test of science. Yes I know you are educated, but so are the
couple living above Toke’s flat.

Oh! By the way I later got a call from a distraught Toke, that mama nanny finally passed on.
She had suffered from hypertension, diabetes and arthritis. I cannot help wondering if this story would have ended differently if she had been taken to the hospital earlier.

Written by Deola Adeniyi who is Media Practitioner in Lagos Nigeria.

Click here to subscribe to The Paradigm Newsletter

Comments

comments

One Comment

  1. Anonymous says:

    i think the couple should be arrested and tried

Share your thoughts

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